...but not only...Travel is our nature and nature is us. Start travelling NOW !

 

 

GENERAL

* Justin Cord Hayes - 747 Things To Do On A Plane, From Liftoff To Landing...

Sleep, read or watch a movie. Not much to do on a plane. Or is there? Air travel boredom will become obsolete with this entertaining guide. Keep yourself busy during the long wait at the airport and the cruise through the skies. Rather than just wait in security checks' long lines or suffer onboard through the latest child-friendly movie, readers can actually do something! Anything! Everything they could possibly dream of has been included for their viewing and pleasure. Make the flight the best part of your holiday. No more counting peanuts, incessant tapping of feet, or drooling on that tiny pillow. The boredom stops here, here, and here.

 

* Eric Weiner - The Geography of Bliss

What makes a nation happy? Is one country's sense of happiness the same as another's? In the last two decades, psychologists and economists have learned a lot about who's happy and who isn't. The Dutch are, the Romanians aren't, and Americans are somewhere in between...

After years of going to the world's least happy countries, Eric Weiner, a veteran foreign correspondent, decided to travel and evaluate each country's different sense of happiness and discover the nation that seemed happiest of all.

He discovers the relationship between money and happiness in tiny and extremely wealthy Qatar (and it's not a good one)

·He goes to Thailand, and finds that not thinking is a contented way of life.

·He goes to the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan, and discovers they have an official policy of Gross National Happiness!

He asks himself why the British don't do happiness?

In Weiner's quest to find the world's happiest places, he eats rotten Icelandic shark, meditates in Bangalore, visits strip clubs in Bangkok and drinks himself into a stupor in Reykjavik. Full of inspired moments, The Geography of Bliss accomplishes a feat few travel books dare and even fewer achieve: to make you happier.

 

* Bruce Parry - Tribe, 15 tribes, 15 cultures, one man's journey

Over several years, Parry spent a month living with fifteen different tribes. The result is an insight into wildly differing cultures that are vibrant, hospitable and full of spirit. The book is based on the hugely successful BBC2 series. His encounters also throw up some thought-provoking and challenging questions: is change good? Should we protect tribes people? And, more importantly, who are we to impose our own cultural sensitivities in our judgement of their customs? 

 

* Mark Beaumont - The Man who Cycled the World

On 15 February 2008, Mark Beaumont pedalled through the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. 194 days and 17 hours previously, he had begun his attempt to circumnavigate the world in record time. Mark smashed the Guinness World Record by an astonishing 81 days. He had travelled more than 18,000 miles on his own through some of the harshest conditions one man and his bicycle can endure, camping wild at night and suffering from constant ailments.

The Man Who Cycled the World is the story not just of that amazing achievement, but of the events that turned Mark Beaumont into the man he is today. From the early years of his free-spirited childhood in the Scottish countryside to present day, he has been equally determined not to settle for an average existence, but to break free and follow his dreams.

His site : http://markbeaumontonline.com/

 

 

 

 

* EUROPE

* William Blacker - Along the Enchanted Way

When William Blacker first crossed the snow-bound passes of northern Romania, he stumbled upon an almost medieval world. There, for many years he lived side by side with the country people, a life ruled by the slow cycle of the seasons, far away from the frantic rush of the modern world. In spring as the pear trees blossomed he ploughed with horses, in summer he scythed the hay meadows and in the freezing winters gathered wood by sleigh from the forest. From sheepfolds harried by wolves, to courting expeditions in the snow, he experienced the traditional way of life to the full, and became accepted into a community who treated him as one of their own. But Blacker was also intrigued by the Gypsies, those dark, foot-loose strangers of spell-binding allure who he saw passing through the village. Locals warned him to stay clear but he fell in love and there followed a bitter struggle. Change is now coming to rural Romania, and William Blacker's adventures will soon be part of its history. From his early carefree days tramping the hills of Transylvania, to the book's poignant ending, Along the Enchanted Way transports us back to a magical country world most of us thought had vanished long ago.

 

 

 

* THE ARCTIC


* Herbert Howard - Ultimate Island Travel : Greenland and Iceland

The Ultimate Destination for your bucket list.... Iceland – “The Land Of Fire And Ice”…… Greenland – “The Land of the Greenlanders”…… Two very beautiful and unusual places to see...... Some of the subjects discussed in the book: When To Go To Iceland, Main Towns In Iceland, Things To See And Do In Iceland, When To Go To Greenland, Largest Glaciers, Main Towns In Greenland, Things To See And Do In Greenland, Festival Of Snow Sculptures and of course lots and lots of detail.

 

* Gretel Ehrlich - This Cold Heaven : Seven Seasons in Greenland

In an unforgettable tribute to the far latitudes, Gretel Ehrlich travels across Greenland, the largest island on earth. Greenland is the largest island on earth. All but five percent of it is covered by a vast ice sheet, an enduring remnant of the last ice age. Despite a uniquely hostile environment, it has been inhabited continuously for thousands of years. Greenlanders retain many of their traditional practices. Some still hunt on sleds made from whale and caribou with packs of dogs; others fashion harpoons from Narwhal tusks; entranced shamans make soul fights under the ice. The modern population lives on the edge of a stone- and ice-age world and has reached a unique understanding of it. Ehrlich mixes stories of European anthropologists who have recorded the ways of the Inuit, with artists who have lived briefly on Greenland's fringe in order to try to capture its extraordinary pure light. Conjuring up Greenland's cruel, beautiful landscape, she shows that it is a land endowed with magical and mysterious properties.

 

* Rockwel Kent - Salamina

First published in 1935, Salamina details artist and adventurer Rockwell Kent s second trip to Greenland. Salamina unfolds as a series of vivid vignettes, each illustrated with Kent s bold black and white drawings. Through his accounts of fishing trips and Christmas festivities, shared meals and budding friendships, Kent acquaints us with the Eskimo and Danish inhabitants of the small vibrant community of Igdlorssuit. Both the native people and the forbidding Arctic landscape held a special beauty for Kent, and he describes them with an artist s eye. Salamina is Kent s Eskimo housekeeper (kifak), who becomes a central figure in the book when she and her daughter come to share Kent s small hut for the year. Kent s wry self-reflection and his poetic meditations on nature, humanity and love make this an enduring classic of travel literature and artistic quest. This Wesleyan edition includes a foreword by art historian Scott R. Ferris that highlights the cultural importance of the text and illustrations and shows that for Kent, inspiration comes from life."

 

* Rockwell Kent - N by E

When artist, illustrator, writer, and adventurer Rockwell Kent first published N by E in a limited edition in 1930, his account of a voyage on a 33-foot cutter from New York Harbor to the rugged shores of Greenland quickly became a collectors' item. Little wonder, for readers are immediately drawn to Kent's vivid descriptions of the experience; we share "the feeling of wind and wet and cold, of lifting seas and steep descents, of rolling over as the wind gusts hit," and the sound "of wind in the shrouds, of hard spray flung on a drum-tight canvas, of rushing water at the scuppers, of the gale shearing a tormented sea." When the ship sinks in a storm-swept fjord within 50 miles of its destination, the story turns to the stranding and subsequent rescue of the three-man crew, salvage of the vessel, and life among native Greenlanders. Magnificently illustrated by Kent's wood-block prints and narrated in his poetic and highly entertaining style, this tale of the perils of killer nor'easters, treacherous icebergs, and impenetrable fog -- and the joys of sperm whales breaching or dawn unmasking a longed-for landfall -- is a rare treat for old salts and landlubbers alike.

 

* Sam Branson - Arctic Diary : Surviving on Ice

It's hardly a surprise to discover that Sam Branson has a love of adventure and a real concern about our future in a world where the climate is changing rapidly. Journeying into the heart of the Arctic wilderness with his father and a film crew, Sam explores the changing landscape and the lives of the native Inuit people who have survived in a relentlessly inhospitable environment for 5000 years.

Sleeping on frozen seas and encountering majestic polar bears, Sam and his father embark together on a winter expedition which Sam must ultimately complete on his own, finding new depths of resilience and courage in a formidable and breathtaking landscape. 

 

 

 

 

* MIDDLE EAST

 

 

 

* AFRICA + Madagascar

* Levison Wood - Walking the Nile 

A major Channel 4 series and a Sunday Times bestseller. His journey is 4,250 miles long. He is walking every step of the way, camping in the wild, foraging for food, fending for himself against multiple dangers. He is passing through rainforest, savannah, swamp, desert and lush delta oasis. He will cross seven, very different countries. No one has ever made this journey on foot. In this detailed, thoughtful, inspiring and dramatic book, recounting Levison Wood's walk along the length of the Nile, he will uncover the history of the Nile, yet through the people he meets and who will help him with his journey, he will come face to face with the great story of a modern Africa emerging out of the past. Exploration and Africa are two of his great passions - they drive him on and motivate his inquisitiveness and resolution not to fail, yet the challenges of the terrain, the climate, the animals, the people and his own psychological resolution will throw at him are immense. The dangers are very real, but so is the motivation for this ex-army officer. If he can overcome the mental and physical challenges, he will be walking into history...
 
 
 
* Ben Rawlence - Nine Lives in the World's Largest Refugee Camp
 
To the charity workers, Dadaab refugee camp is a humanitarian crisis; to the Kenyan government, it is a 'nursery for terrorists'; to the western media, it is a dangerous no-go area; but to its half a million residents, it is their last resort. Situated hundreds of miles from any other settlement, deep within the inhospitable desert of northern Kenya where only thorn bushes grow, Dadaab is a city like no other. Its buildings are made from mud, sticks or plastic, its entire economy is grey, and its citizens survive on rations and luck. Over the course of four years, Ben Rawlence became a first-hand witness to a strange and desperate limbo-land, getting to know many of those who have come there seeking sanctuary. Among them are Guled, a former child soldier who lives for football; Nisho, who scrapes an existence by pushing a wheelbarrow and dreaming of riches; Tawane, the indomitable youth leader; and schoolgirl Kheyro, whose future hangs upon her education. In City of Thorns, Rawlence interweaves the stories of nine individuals to show what life is like in the camp and to sketch the wider political forces that keep the refugees trapped there. Lucid, vivid and illuminating, here is an urgent human story with deep international repercussions, brought to life through the people who call Dadaab home.
 
 
* Sian Pritchard-Jones & Bob Gibbons - Africa Overland Plus a Return Route Through Asia
 
Africa is addictive. Africa has colourful people, bustling markets, starry nights, utter desert silence, a cacophony of cicadas, inviting nomads and modern entrepreneurs. Stuck in a deep mud hole, pushing a motorcycle through sand or enjoying the camaraderie of an overloaded public bus, no one is far from the soul of the Dark Continent. Africa Overland, the adventurers' definitive choice, provides practical sections on buying, maintaining, and driving a vehicle alongside a new section on overland routes in Asia.
 
 
* Mark Eveleigh - Maverick in Madagascar
An account of the author's adventures in Madagascar, including tales of the Vazimba people, the ancient "Isle of the Moon" and the bandit country of the "Zone Rouge". Myth and reality blur in the land that has spawned sacred crocodiles, blood guzzling spirit animals, and a socialist pirate commune. A highly entertaining and evocative account of an expedition to the island,in search of a mythical tribe of white pygmies. Illus.
 
 
* Gerald Durrel - Aye-Aye and I
 
'In the gloom it came along the branches towards me, its round, hypnotic eyes blazing, its spoon-like ears turning to and fro independently like radar dishes . . . it was Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky come to life . . . one of the most incredible creatures I had ever been privileged to meet.'The fourth largest island in the world, Madagascar is home to woodlice the size of golf balls, moths the size of Regency fans and the Aye-Aye, a type of lemur held by local superstion to be an omen of death. But when Gerald Durrell visited the island, the destruction of the forests meant that the Aye-Aye and many other creatures were in danger of extinction.Told with his unique sense of humour and inimitable charm, Gerald Durrell's The Aye Aye and I is the final adventure from one Britain's best loved conservationists.
 
 
 
 
 
 
* ASIA
 
* Dominic Ziegler - Black Dragon River 
 
Black Dragon River is a personal journey down one of Asia’s great rivers that reveals the region’s essential history and culture. The world’s ninth largest river, the Amur serves as a large part of the border between Russia and China. As a crossroads for the great empires of Asia, this area offers journalist Dominic Ziegler a lens with which to examine the societies at Europe's only borderland with east Asia. He follows a journey from the river's top to bottom, and weaves the history, ecology and peoples to show a region obsessed with the past—and to show how this region holds a key to the complex and critical relationship between Russia and China today.
 
One of Asia’s mightiest rivers, the Amur is also the most elusive. The terrain it crosses is legendarily difficult to traverse. Near the river’s source, Ziegler travels on horseback from the Mongolian steppe into the taiga, and later he is forced by the river’s impassability to take the Trans-Siberian Railway through the four-hundred-mile valley of water meadows inland. As he voyages deeper into the Amur wilderness, Ziegler also journeys into the history of the peoples and cultures the river’s path has transformed.
 
The known history of the river begins with Genghis Khan and the rise of the Mongolian empire a millennium ago, and the story of the region has been one of aggression and conquest ever since. The modern history of the river is the story of Russia's push across the Eurasian landmass to China. For China, the Amur is a symbol of national humiliation and Western imperial land seizure; to Russia it is a symbol of national regeneration, its New World dreams and eastern prospects. The quest to take the Amur was to be Russia’s route to greatness, replacing an oppressive European identity with a vibrant one that faced the Pacific. Russia launched a grab in 1854 and took from China a chunk of territory equal in size nearly to France and Germany combined. Later, the region was the site for atrocities meted out on the Russian far east in the twentieth century during the Russian civil war and under Stalin.
 
The long shared history on the Amur has conditioned the way China and Russia behave toward each other—and toward the outside world. To understand Putin’s imperial dreams, we must comprehend Russia’s relationship to its far east and how it still shapes the Russian mind. Not only is the Amur a key to Putinism, its history is also embedded in an ongoing clash of empires with the West. 

 

 

* SOUTH  AMERICA

* John Gimlette - Wild Coast : Travels on South America's Untamed Edge

 

 

 

* NORTH  AMERICA

 * Bill Bryson - A Walk in the Woods

In the company of his friend Stephen Katz (last seen in the bestselling Neither Here nor There), Bill Bryson set off to hike the Appalachian Trail, the longest continuous footpath in the world. Ahead lay almost 2,200 miles of remote mountain wilderness filled with bears, moose, bobcats, rattlesnakes, poisonous plants, disease-bearing tics, the occasional chuckling murderer and - perhaps most alarming of all - people whose favourite pastime is discussing the relative merits of the external-frame backpack.

Facing savage weather, merciless insects, unreliable maps and a fickle companion whose profoundest wish was to go to a motel and watch The X-Files, Bryson gamely struggled through the wilderness to achieve a lifetime's ambition - not to die outdoors.

 

 

* LATIN AMERICA

 

 

 

* ANTARCTICA

* Ernest Shackleton - South : The 'Endurance' Expedition

As the first world war broke out across Europe, Shackleton's expedition to the South Pole became trapped by ice. Their ship, the Endurance, was crushed and the men were forced to survive in and escape from one of the world's most hostile environment. Traversing glaciers, scaling cliffs and crossing treacherous seas in open boats, all the time threatened by brutal cold and hunger, the men, through their own strength and Shackleton's leadership, all made it to safety. This story makes the efforts of latterday adventurers pale in comparison.

 

 

 

* AUSTRALIA

* Bill Bryson - Down Under : Travels in a Sunburned Country

It is the driest, flattest, hottest, most desiccated, infertile and climatically aggressive of all the inhabited continents and still Australia teems with life – a large portion of it quite deadly. In fact, Australia has more things that can kill you in a very nasty way than anywhere else.

Ignoring such dangers – and yet curiously obsessed by them – Bill Bryson journeyed to Australia and promptly fell in love with the country. And who can blame him? The people are cheerful, extrovert, quick-witted and unfailingly obliging: their cities are safe and clean and nearly always built on water; the food is excellent; the beer is cold and the sun nearly always shines. Life doesn’t get much better than this…

 

 

 

 

* THE PACIFIC

 

 

 

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